On the significance of the resurrection

I was asked to write an article for our church news sheet the other day on the significance of the resurrection. So to prepare me for this I started reading Adrian Warnock’s book ‘Raised with Christ; How the Resurrection Changes Everything’. And this got me thinking, I guess many of us know the comfort of the cross; we look fondly on it for assurance of forgiveness, freedom from sin, knowledge of God’s love for us. I would imagine that all three of us (Phil, Paul and I) have articulated these truths several times over. I guess we are comfortable and at home with these truths and our congregations are too.

Yet there is Word far more challenging and perhaps comforting in the good news of the resurrection. It is the calling not simply to what Martyn Lloyd Jones described as ‘dead’ orthodoxy but to a living faith. It is the calling to come to God’s house expecting to be thrilled by the nearness, the power and the tenderness of God with us.

I think in my own choice of hymns and preaching I can focus too much upon the cross. I’m not saying that this is wholly bad because the cross is certainly central to our faith, but the resurrection should be also. So significant is the resurrection that the apostle Paul writes: ‘if Christ has not been raised then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain’ (1 Corinthians 15:14). For it is the resurrection that sets apart Jesus’ death from that of any other martyr. It is the resurrection that explains the growth of the Christian faith from a handful of Galilean peasants to a thriving faith throughout the Mediterranean world. It is the resurrection that makes it possible for us to have, not simply true beliefs but, living faith- a relationship with Jesus.

Jesus said, ‘If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him’ (John 14:23). This encounter with the resurrected Jesus who makes his home with us, by the Spirit, has been the experience of Christian people right through the ages.

The Welsh Methodist, Howell Harris (1714-1773), described his own experience saying: ‘Suddenly I felt my heart melting within me like wax before fire, and love to God for my Saviour. I felt also not only love and peace, but a longing to die and be with Christ. Then there came a cry into my soul within that I had never known before – Abba, Father!’ It can be intimidating to read of people who have had such intimate and profound encounters with Jesus in the Spirit, but I believe that these accounts are genuine and should give us hope that Jesus has yet more to offer us.

Christian faith shouldn’t be a static thing. It should be a living growing deepening journey as we discover just how faithful and true Jesus is.

Father God, we thank you for the good news of the resurrection and the living relationship we have with Jesus through it. Speak to us by your Spirit help us to know more personally your love for us, so that in our daily lives we would know the joy of true communion with you. Help us to come to your Word and to worship with expectant hearts willing to be thrilled by your limitless grace. In the name of your Son, our Saviour, Jesus Christ we pray. Amen.

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About James Church

I'm a Minister of the Gospel serving Radford Road Church and Lillington Free Church in Royal Leamington Spa. I grew up as a son of the manse, but I came to personal faith in my early teens. I am committed to the authority of Scripture and the truths found there that by grace through faith in Christ we are reconciled to God to His praise and glory.

Posted on March 9, 2012, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Graham Leverton

    Being a Christian is a growing and deepening journey James. It can be nothing else because of the kindness of the grace of God. It’s best not to say ‘it should be’ because if it isn’t, it isn’t what we’re calling it. But I agree with your general thrust

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